Thursday, November 23, 2017
   
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FAQs

What is Heart4Kids?
Heart4Kids is a stand-alone 501(c) 3 entity, founded in 2003 to help improve the quality of life for African children, particularly those in Zimbabwe, whose lives have been shattered by the HIV/AIDS virus. Heart4Kids seeks to protect children by providing them food, clothing, educational and medical assistance, and above all, hope.
 
How does Heart4Kids help children?
Heart4Kids delivers educational and medical supplies to children in Zimbabwe, and is opening an AIDS orphanage in Jan. 2011 to house children who have become homeless or moved into abusive households as a result of AIDS-related deaths in their families. The orphanage will be staffed with tutors and medical workers, and stocked with essential medical supplies, educational materials, food and clothing. Within the next two years, Heart4Kids plans to open a Center of Hope in Zimbabwe, which will house 100 children, provide water and a medical clinic for the community.
 
Are my donations tax-deductible?
Yes; Heart4Kids has been granted federal 501(c)(3) non-profit status, so all donations are tax-deductible.
 
What percentage of my donation will go to the children?
Heart4Kids relies on volunteers and has no paid staff; therefore,100%
will go to the kids. Heart4Kids volunteers will go on mission trips, like the one taking place in December 2010, and deliver supplies and donations directly to on-site workers.
 
Why are you not able to get funding from public or private grants?
International criticism of Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe has led to sanctions against the country and a major drop in international aid to help the country’s children. Some children have been abused, exploited or sold into trafficking rings.
 
How bad is the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Africa and Zimbabwe?
According to a research done by the Avert organization, an estimated 22.4 million adults and children were living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa at the end of 2008. During that year, an estimated 1.4 million Africans died from AIDS. Around 14.1 million children have lost one or both parents to the epidemic, and in 2008 an estimated 1.8 million children were living with HIV, according to Avert.
 
In Zimbabwe alone, over 1 million orphans are living with AIDS and hunger and some are becoming homeless. The population of orphans is increasing as more adults continue to die.